The community of the realm in Scotland, 1249–1424
History, law and charters in a recreated kingdom

Dynamic Edition: Concepts

Below are the concepts which will lie behind the display and functionality of our dynamic editions. They are, however, work in progress so do send any feedback to cotr2020@gmail.com.

These were updated on 9 October 2018 and represent the work of the project team on and before this date.

What does a DDE do?

A DDE allows a modern editor to represent textual movement and scribal agency within a work. It allows a modern user to access the multiple presentations of the work across its manuscript-texts and better and more accurately identify what medieval audiences might have read and/or heard of a particular work.

Concepts:

Codex:

The artefact today (typically a bound volume), with a shelfmark. Codices can contain multiple manuscripts.

Work

Text with a sufficiently clear identity to make it potentially the subject of a modern edition. It is often referred to by name and/or title /or presumed authorship (e.g. Glanvill; Regiam Majestatem). A work can exist in multiple manuscript-texts and may be constituted by many versions

Manuscript:

A codicological unit that contains the copy of a work. (This could be the entire volume, or part of a volume, or even stretching across more than one codex.)

Manuscript-text:

The text (of a work) as contained in a single manuscript. There is always an element of editorial intervention in the removal of manuscript-text into another format, whether print or digital.

Abstracted text

A text that involves an element of editorial intervention or interpretation, however small.

Version-text

Refers to the abstracted text generated from a manuscript-group. It is generated from the abstracted texts of each manuscript-text in the group.

Manuscript-group

A group of manuscripts whose singular manuscript-text of a work have a distinctively common form, structure, content or shared context so as to constitute a Version. The commonality that defines a manuscript-group could be significant similarity of content or a similar context of occurrence. A manuscript-group is not primarily defined by shared readings, although the extent of shared readings contribute to an editor’s judgement about the extent of commonality between manuscript-texts. It is therefore not to be confused with recension.

Settled text (in original language)

All words which, if read out, would probably have sounded the same in all manuscript-texts.

Unsettled text (in original language)

All words or groups of words which are not present in all manuscript-texts so that the word(s) would definitely have sounded differently when read out, and all words or groups of words given in at least one manuscript-text but not all.

Unsettled text (in original language): content filter

A filter applied to highlight words or groups of words of unsettled text, whose presence has added empirical content to the manuscript-text, whether settled or unsettled.

Settled text (in translation)

All words which have the same meaning in all manuscript-texts

Unsettled text (in translation)

Any word or group of words which add material to the meaning of a manuscript-text compared with others and any word or group of words which has a different meaning in at least one manuscript-text compared with others.

Unsettled text (in translation): content filter

A filter applied to highlight words or groups of words of unsettled text, whose presence has added empirical content to the manuscript-text, whether settled or unsettled.

Source: a known predecessor for a particular piece of text, previously (and continuing to be) circulating as part of a different work. A source is not to be confused with an exemplar, Glanvill is a source of Regiam Maiestatem but we don't know the compiler's exemplar.

Exemplar

The known physical manuscript used by a scribe which provides the textual material for his own work.